Search

Salay Consulting & Social Media Services

CleanTech & Renewable Energy Research, Social Media, Tech Trends

Welcome to Salay Consulting

Hello, and welcome to Salay Consulting & Social Media Services. I am very happy to get this business slowly off the ground. Like every good thing, it takes a while. We are living in some exciting times. Social media have changed how we communicate. We can connect with anyone in the world with the touch of a smart phone. Renewable energy and cleantech is moving at an advanced pace, and is making many utilities re think how they do business in order to meet millennial demands.

Salay Consulting offers many services, which cater towards the needs of the 21st century business world. Basic social media services, cleantech/renewable energy writing and analysis. I also offer consulting and speaking engagement on tech trends.

If you are wondering why I named this business Salay Consulting & Social Media Services, I decided to name it after the Michif word for sun, which is a Metis language. I wanted to honor my metis background, and figure I would do it this way.

I think year one will be a fun and challenging time. I look forward to meeting new contacts, building new ideas, while growing an exciting, new side business, which I hope to make it full-time in the future.

Megwetch.

Adam Johnston

Owner, Salay Consulting & Social Media Services

 

post

Featured post

Energy As A Service Market to Reach $221.1 US Billion by 2026: Report

Although a relatively new business model, commercial & industrial (CI) Energy as a Service (EaaS) is expected to dramatically grow within the next decade, based on a new report.

According to cleantech research firm Navigant Research, the CI EaaS market by 2026 will reach $221.1 US billion.

room-305839_1920
Image Credit via Pixabay by bykst. Under Public Domain via Creative Commons

Changes in the delivery of energy are the driving factor behind the rise of EaaS companies. In the old days, consumers would (and still do on many levels) get their energy from a central source (your local utility), be charged and billed a monthly rate. Some months your energy bill would be higher (winter and summer months especially) than others.

However, today we are seeing a shift being played out on the energy market stage. Navigant Research notes energy companies and sustainability managers are taking advantage of new business models and digitized technologies, which are helping to decentralize the energy markets.

“Navigant Research anticipates that these evolving grid and customer factors will converge to give rise to demand for vendor-based business model disruptors that can provide turnkey energy as a service solutions (EaaS),” said Navigant’s website.

Eaas has lots of potential in making the customer energy experience as un-limitless as possible. EaaS providers can manage many aspects of a consumer’s energy needs. Examples include energy supply, energy use, asset & program management, and strategy, according to Navigant.

EaaS companies can use innovative services, financial solutions & technological tools to ensure clients are happy with their energy system.

Players within the EaaS ecosystem include standard utilities, third-party vendors, and start-up companies, who are providing disruptive solutions within the technical, financing and procurement within the energy market, according to Navigant Research.

As EaaS establish themselves; energy portfolios will be outsourced to fully equipped companies “with a comprehensive set of technical financing and deployment options.” According to Navigant.

This report is in line with an overall shift in societal attitudes on energy. Concerns over a warming planet due to climate change, falling renewable energy costs, and Millennials wanting more choice in energy options will only help to fuel EaaS platforms heading into the third decade of the new millennium. Add other underlying factors including sharp price drop on lithium-ion batteries needed to make battery storage units, plus 34 billion connected devices within the Internet of Things eco system by 2020 will ensure EaaS companies are going to have very profitable opportunities soon.

As Warren Buffet said, “energy deregulation will be the largest transfer of wealth in history.” EaaS will play a part in this. Shortly, consumers may have options besides a local energy utility thanks to possible EaaS platforms.

What do you think of EaaS? Will they become a serious option for consumers within the energy market over the next decade? What has to happen for EaaS to grow not only in the US but Canada/Manitoba? Feel free to email at salayconsulting@gmail.com, or follow on Twitter at @salayservices.

This week In #CleanTech July 16, 2017

Here is your weekly roundup of the unique, hottest stories related to cleantech, and climate policy for the week of July 16, 2017.

macbook
Image Credit via Pixabay via Real-Napster. Under Public Domain.

Apple announced this week they are building a second data centre in Denmark, which will run on 100% renewable energy. According to Fortune, the southern Denmark city of Aabenraa will house the centre. The centre, will house power for the App Store, iTunes, iMessage, Siri, and Maps for Europe. Apple Nordic Manager Erik Stannow said to Fortune they are excited to increase their data facilities while supporting clean power in Denmark. Apple has ramped up renewable energy projects recently. This includes building a data centre in China, which will also run on renewable energy. Apple has been supportive of the move to clean power, going against US President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw out of the Paris climate accord. This makes sense considering the information technology, and cleantech sectors are closely connected with each other, as our energy system is becoming more digitized,  like the Internet.

California is one step closer to running on 100% renewable power. According to Climate Progress, a bill sponsored by Senate President Kevin de León (D), passed through a legislative committee this week. The proposed bill, if it becomes law, would require the state’s electricity to come from 100% renewable sources (wind, solar, hydroelectricity) by 2045, while bumping up the 50% requirement from 2030 to 2026. Hawaii is also targeting 100% renewables, while other states, including Massachusetts, are contemplating similar policies as states attempt to modernize their energy systems.

And lastly, a new report from the Asian Development Bank (ADB) suggests climate change will have severe repercussions on Asia. If emissions are not cut, the ADB warns, temperatures could rise 6C by the end of the century, setting the stage for many shocks. This includes a 3C increase seeing grain production decrease by 10%; More health risks from waterborne diseases; further migrations into already sprawling populations, which would add further strain on dwindling resources.

What do you think of Apple’s push to on going towards 100% renewable energy for its data centers? Or is 100% renewable electricity possible for California in our lifetime? Drop a line at salayconsulting@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter at @salayservices.

This Week in #CleanTech- July 9, 2017

Welcome to the first of what were some of the hottest, most interesting stories related to cleantech, and climate policy. This column will appear at the end of the week.

windmills-984137_1920
Image Credit via Pixabay. Under Public Domain Via Creative Commons

France this week announced they were banning the sale of combustible engine vehicles by 2040. Germany and had followed suit last year, banning sales of gas and diesel cars by 2030, and, while Norway is targeting for zero emission cars by 2025. No word if Canada or the United States plan to do likewise anytime soon, and its very unlikely this will occur. However, anything is possible given a study last year points to 2025 were all vehicles sold will be electric, and this year seems its electric vehicle’s (EV’s) watershed moment, with all these news stories that keep occurring.

Tesla announced this week it’s building the world’s largest lithium-ion battery storage facility. According to TechCrunch.com, the plant will be completed by December 2017 at Australia’s Hornsdale Wind farm. Tesla Commercial battery storage PowerPack will store total capacity of 100 MW/129 MWh, while capture the wind power during high points of the day and use when necessary. Tesla revealed its PowerWall for residential consumers, and PowerPack for commercial users, to revolutionize the battery storage market, which is critical for resolving intermittency problems with the wind and solar power.

Minnesota gave its blessing to Xcel Energy for the largest expansion of wind energy in the north US MidWest. According to Electric, Lights & Power, Xcel plans to build a total of 1,550 MW of new wind farms across North, South Dakota, and Minnesota by 2020. Xcel will own 1,150 MW, while the remaining 400 MW will be bought by Xcel, thanks to long-term Power Purchasing Agreements (PPA).  When completed in three years, the 1550 MW of wind power will provide 800,000 homes with a clean energy source. Currently, Minnesota ranks sixth overall in the US installed wind capacity with 3,499 MW, while North Dakota has 2,846 MW, and, South Dakota with 977 MW, according to American Wind Energy Association.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu declared on Thursday his city has more at stake than any other city in the world when it comes to climate change. Climate Progress notes the mayor released a climate policy plan which targets eliminating its cities carbon emissions in half by 2030. Twelve years ago, category three storm Hurricane Katrina pounded New Orleans and cost insurance $41.7 billion USD. The storm also kickstarted a serious discussion between extreme weather events and climate change in North America.

And finally, in the cute story of the week, China Merchants New Energy Group decided to uniquely design their latest solar farm in Datong China, to look like a panda. Business Insider said the cleantech firm plans to build more panda style solar farms, like the 248-acre one just built.

What did you think was the biggest or unique story in the cleantech world? was there anything missing from this list. Feel free to reach out. Follow us on Twitter at @salayservices, or by email at salayconsulting@gmail.com

Electric Vehicles Are Reaching Their “iPhone” Moment in 2017

When the history books come to pass on 2017, one will look on this year as to where electric vehicles (EV’s) had its “iPhone moment.”

A decade ago, Apple released its revolutionary product. Although smartphones were around before, the iPhone helped change a lot of things. It helped changed how smartphones, and eventually the public warmed to mobile computing. It helped create new spillover industries while flipping old ones upside down.

tesla-1738969_1920
Image Credit via Pixabay. Under Public Domain via Creative Commons.

Three factors are contributing this year to why EV’s are reaching that watershed or “iPhone” moment.

EV’s are becoming More Affordable as Battery Prices Plummet: The first shipments of Tesla’s Model 3 have now begun to hit the streets. Initially showcased last year, Elon Musk’s company took 373,000 in reservations as of March 2017. What is so special about this car? It’s Tesla’s first EV into the affordable mass consumer market at $35,000 USD a piece. One of the criticisms with EV’s was the initial excessive costs for consumers.

However, declining lithium-ion battery prices are now making it more affordable to mass produce EV’s, along with Tesla’s Gigafactory 1 in Nevada.

With batteries coming less costly, EV’s are nearing a tipping point where they are near cost competitive with combustible engine vehicles. A recent report underlines this. By 2025, all new vehicles will be electric. It’s especially important to know given the Paris climate agreement requires all participants keep CO2 levels well below 2C while aiming for 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.  Transportation alone creates 23% of all carbon emissions, according to the World Bank. Thus, creating affordable, clean tech transportation options at the mass consumer level is essential in cutting carbon emissions out from transportation.

While other companies, including Nissan, Chevy already produce EV’s. Tesla has had critical acclaim with its prior other models, including the Model S. Just like how the iPhone 10 years ago was synonymous with smartphones.

Companies are Going All In on EV’s: 2017 is also the breaking point where companies are making plans to slam the brakes on fossil fuel based vehicles.

Volvo recently announced by 2019 they will cease to make combustion engine vehicles, and manufacture only EV’s or hybrids. This is the silver bullet car manufacturers need to go all-electric. In 2007, Apple entering the smartphone market with the iPhone helped lure other companies, including Samsung, LG, Sony, Nokia, and Chinese tech companies to get into the smartphone game, providing more consumer choice. Smartphone costs also came crashing down to insanely low levels. It’s now possible to get a smartphone for $32 (compared to $499 or $599 US in 2007 for an iPhone). While it’s highly unlikely anyone will see an EV for $32 in their lifetime, it’s entirely possible as more entrants flood the market, prices will drop to make EV’s even more affordable for Main Street.

 

Global Policy: You can also thank public policy makers around the world around the globe for helping contribute to EV’s watershed moment happening now.

While Trump dumped the Paris accord, other countries are strengthening their ties by supporting cleantech. France recently announced earlier this week by 2040. They will be eliminating the sale of all petrol fuelled based vehicles. Last year, Germany vowed to do the same by 2030. Policy makers are helping to shift towards cleaner vehicles, which adds another layer towards EV’s becoming a real force.

Thomas Friedman’s 2016 book Thank You For Being Late discussed how in 2007 was the watershed moment for many key technologies, ranging from cloud computing storage, solar energy, and smartphones.  Ten years later, thanks to declining lithium-ion battery prices, companies moving towards just electric cars, and supporting legislation, are helping EV’s have their “iPhone moment.”

So what you think? Has electric vehicles reached their watershed moment this year? You can reach me on Twitter at @salaysevices, or by email at salayservies@gmail.com

 

iPhone at Ten Years Old

June 29th, 2007 was a big day as Apple’s iPhone (otherwise known as the “Jesus Phone”) sold for the first time. After that, the rest was history. Nothing has been the same since.  With its touch screen capabilities, allowing consumers to type at ease, without punching the daylights out of a BlackBerry QWERTY keyboard (or until you find you’ve been auto-corrected). Apple has gone on to sell 1.1 billion iPhones in ten years.

The iPhone has caused change, flipping things upside down.

Here is how the iPhone has (in)directly made an impact.

iphone-410311_1280
Image Credit: iPhone by JESHOOTS via Pixabay. Under Public Domain via the Creative Commons

Opening up Smartphone Choice and Leapfrogging Past Old Infrastructure: After iPhone’s launch, we saw an explosion of companies get into the game. Google released its Android mobile operating system to counteract Apple’s operating system iOS. Then manufacturers Samsung, Sony, LG, wanted a piece of the action. Apple and Samsung today are constantly jockeying for the top position in the smartphone universe. Even an Indian manufacturer was able to produce a smartphone at a cost of $32.00. This is critical, considering there will be 4.1 billion users globally in 2020. Many of these new users will come from developing nations, who initially had limited to no Internet infrastructure.

There’s an App for That: Before the iPhone, it was more common for people to refer to apps regarding filling out job or credit card applications. Now you can not go without a day using mobile apps on your smartphone. Mobile apps took off when Apple launched its iPhone App Store in July 2008. It created new markets for IT developers who were looking to expand entrepreneurial opportunities outside of standard computing software. After Apple’s App store, came Google Play, which serves as  Android mobile app store. The app economy is only expected to grow. Analysts predict by 2020, the mobile app economy to reach $101 billion. According to c/net there are over 2 million apps now in the App store and “have spawned industries that couldn’t exist without smartphones,” naming car-sharing services Uber and Lyft.

Social Media Becomes More Social: While social media was here before the iPhone with MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter, iPhone’s launch helped create a breeding ground for how we know social media now. Facebook posts, tweets are now instantaneous, thanks to the iPhone. Mobile social media helped cover major events this decade faster than major news networks, including the Haiti Earthquake, Arab Spring, And the 2013 Alberta Floods.

However, with all good things, there has been some negative consequences with increased mobile social media use. It’s raised red flags amongst cyber security experts. Future Crimes author Marc Goodman suggests consumers are increasing their vulnerability, thanks to data given away freely on social media sites, and mobile apps.

 Mobile Apps lead the Path to a Smart and Connected World: As c/net pointed out, without the App’s store, these industries may not exist. The iPhone indirectly made mobile computing accessible to the common folk. Smartphone apps now make it easier for homes to become “smart.” From smart thermostats, including Google’s Nest, to Phillips Hue, a wireless controlled LED light bulb flows in between ubiquitous Internet connection, thanks to Wi-Fi and cell towers. It’s now possible, in 2017 to monitor your house’s heat, lighting, and find how much solar energy you are producing and consuming– all on your smartphone! This is big for consumers who are all in on the energy efficiency train.

Smart homes are only expected to increase in stature as more web-based devices increase with the advancement of the Internet of Things (IoT). Projections by 2020 have a total between 30.750 billion connected device on the Internet, while IoT market value is expected to reach $267 billion globally.

It’s hard to believe the iPhone has been around for a decade. No one should ever give Apple credit for creating smartphones, social media, or smart devices.

However, by tweaking and improving the smartphone with the iPhone, its help to entice competitors into smartphone markets, and give more choices to consumers; penetrate the mobile app market; make social media what it is today, and pave a path for Internet-connected devices which make our homes smart. The spillover benefits from the iPhone were the legacy of Steve Jobs iconic contribution to mobile phones.

Happy 10th birthday, iPhone. The world will never be the same again.

 

 

 

 

Slow and Steady Will Win the IoT Race

You know the saying, “It’s more of a marathon than a sprint.” That’s especially the case with the Internet of Things (IoT).

IoT is one of the hottest emerging technologies today which offers a lot of promise. From improving logistics to creating smart energy systems and cities, IoT may provide some solutions to some of the biggest social and economic challenges facing today’s society.

things-2155563_1920 (1)
Image Credit by geralt via Pixabay. Under Public Domain via the Creative Commons

However, just like any up and coming technologies which debut in the past, there is always some unexpected bugs. From the early days of the Internet, cell phones, to renewable energy. IoT is no different.

Take last fall. In October 2016, a distributed denial of service attack (DDoS) showcased the vulnerabilities of a connected world in the IoT age.

Botnet malware, played a role in these attacks. Many IoT-based devices were affected in this attack, as chaos ensued, and many top websites to faded to black temporarily.

Adjunct Senior Fellow on Cybersecurity David Fidler from the Council on Foreign Relations told The Guardian right after the attacks showed massive security holes currently seen in IoT on a large-scale by non-governmental groups.

“Imagine what a well-resourced state actor could do with insecure IOT devices,” Fidler added.

As cyber security risks remain a concern within the IoT space, failure to finish projects is also a challenge for IoT developers.

A recent Cisco study suggests 60% of IoT ideas fall flat at the beginning. They also pointed out 26% of all businesses surveyed had 100% success with their IoT projects.

While these recent events and studies give IoT a slight back eye, let’s keep in mind these are very early days within the IoT ecosystem.

It was only just 18 years ago in 1999, the phrase “IoT” was coined by Proctor & Gamble’s Kevin Ashton. That’s ten years after the invention of the World Wide Web (WWW) by Tim Berners-Lee. This was back when the WWW and Internet infrastructure was in its infancy and slowly maturing. Today’s Internet and WWW has far more capabilities compared to 1999 where there were only around 248 million global users. Now in 2017 its nearing 3.8 billion.

As author Jeremy Rifkin said in his 2014 book The Zero Marginal Cost Society, three Internet components (communications, energy, and logistics) are the backbone of IoT, which is helping to create a “third industrial revolution.” Significant ramifications will occur for many industries with their fortunes turned upside down. As we see new exciting opportunities, in smart homes, block chain, fintech, and 3D printing thanks to the IoT space.

Anywhere from 20 to 34 billion connected IoT devices are expected online by 2020. Total economic activity will reach worth $3.7 billion, according to McKinsey.

Security concerns have and always will remain a top concern amongst IT personal. It won’t get any easier with more devices flowing ubiquitously. But security experts are keen on learning to reduce security risks. Blockchain technology may provide some of the solutions required to limit security risks within the IoT ecosphere.

As for failures within IoT concepts, Cisco said 61% of participants have only started to realize the potential of what IoT technologies for their companies. Once people become more educated about not only what IoT is, but what it can do, then you will start to see more successes. You will start to see the cream of the crop rise within this industry. New and exciting out of the box opportunities will spring up, including in marketing, as businesses look to provide their customers with an ever-present connected experience.

The rise of the Internet had many trials and tribulations during its first marathon in transforming society in the 21st century. IoT will see the same thing as well as it overcomes the pressure to sprint to the finish line.

What do you think? What will it take companies to invest in IoT development, while cutting security concerns and possibilities of failure? Feel free to contact me at salayconsulting@gmail.com or on Twitter at @salayservices.

 

 

 

 

Promise and Potential Abounds within the Social Media/Internet of Things Nexus

The Internet of Things (IoT) offers a lot of promise for marketers within social media. With 34 to 50 billion devices online by 2020. IoT gives lots of new possibilities for social media managers to lick their chops into.

Dubbed “social media for machines” by analysts because of its machine to machine (m2m) learning capabilities, IoT will change the conversation on how we look at social media. It’s no longer just snapping selfies, liking, or sharing. Here is where social media advocates can capitalize on IoT.

communication-1927697_1920
Image Credit by geralt via Pixabay. Under Public Domain via the Creative Commons

Improving Customer Experiences: One way where social media can leverage IOT is through maximizing customer experiences. Uber and Spotify have teamed up where Uber users can use their Spotify premium account to personalize their rides. Uber CEO Travis Kalernick said Uber is delivering a unique experience by teaming up with Spotify by allowing passengers to customize their rides more.

The marriage of social media and IoT will also provide a better client experience with showing how much money customers can save on their utility bills. SolarCity’s MySolarCity mobile app allows customers to see how much they are saving by going solar while using their social media accounts to show off to their friends on how much they are saving by going solar while building a community.

Improving Data Management: Better management of data is without a doubt the most valuable lesson which social media managers need to understand and capitalize on IoT’s potential. Marketing Journal suggests IoT will provide multiple ways of communicating between machines, brands, and customers. This includes real-time observation on customer behavior, with customer resource management (CRM) tools, while social media marketers can use these tools to improve their products. For example, Google’s Nest smart thermostat, which allows for consumers to adjust their home temperature using wireless Internet, is the epitome of IoT devices. Nest analysts can then compare the data, which can help provide their customers on how to improve their energy, while at the same time enhance their products for future development.

Besides Nest, another scenario could be a Samsung smart fridge tells when a customer is running out of apples; the fridge would tell its customer to buy new ones. The data could provide both supermarkets and apple producers on what apples consumers stock their fridge with, and help assist grocery stores in catering to certain demographics.

The Melding of Industries: If there is one wild card, social media marketers need to take heart on the rise of IoT will shrink time, space among industries. In his 2014 book The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, The Collaborative Commons, & The Eclipse of Capitalism, author Jeremy Rifkin said the merging of three Internets: Communications, Energy Internet, and Logistics Internet laid the foundation for IoT. Rifkin also argued in The Third Industrial Revolution, communications helped spearhead past industrial revolutions in human history. It’s important for social media managers to grasp this moment currently being played in front of us, and understand how communications, logistics, and energy, now more than ever are weaved through technologies fantastic bow. We have seen this through the World Wide Web, and social media’s infant stages, as consumers were becoming producers (re prosumers). We saw this initially with the media industry. We are now seeing this with both energy and finance. Mosiac was a great early example of utilizing social media renewable energy and crowdsource finance to produce affordable solar ownership for investors. Now with blockchain technologies on the way, this will make financial options more secure for crowd funding options, as consumers look to become both investors and users of their products.

Conclusion:

If done correctly, IoT can open a bevy of opportunity for social media managers who are willing to find a bonanza of opportunities for forward thinking marketers within the insights of finance, communications, and technology nexus.

 

Analysis: REthinking 2017 Accelerating the Global Energy Transformation

Reports are key indicators of where modern trends are going. That’s especially true with developing industries like renewable energy. Report after report have only confirmed renewable energy is shaking up traditional energy markets.

The International Renewable Energy Association’s (IRENA) REthinking Energy: Accelerating the Global Energy Transformation confirms these trends. IRENA recently released their findings in energy and policy development.

According to the report, global solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity reached 219 gigawatts (GW) in 2015, more than five times the capacity in 2010 (40 GW). This trend is expected to continue with new global PV capacity in 2017 supposed to reach 79 GW, according to an IHS technology report. By 2030, solar PV capacity could account for 7% of total global power generation.

What’s been helpful for solar energies rise to the top has been sharp declines in prices. In many countries, solar prices have reached new lows, according to IRENA. Solar energy is now cheaper than fossil fuels in many nations. Solar PV prices have fallen by 80% since 2009, said IRENA.

Wind power is also strong. Currently according to the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), global capacity reached 432.33 GW in 2015, 63.48 GW more than from in 2014.

IRENA said wind turbines prices have fallen by one-third since 2009. Even without government support, onshore wind farms are cost competitive or less than gas-fired power plants, oil, or coal, according to IRENA.

Falling prices in both wind and solar have not only increased capacity but investment, as these two technologies captured a whopping 90% of 2015 global renewable energy investments.

windmill-62257_1920

Photo Credit via Pixabay by Steppinstars. Under Public Domain by the Creative Commons.

While the wind and solar power’s growing energy prowess is necessary, battery storage units, which can store both these technologies when needed during non-peak periods will play a critical role going forward. By 2020, IRENA expects this growing market to reach USD $14 billion, up from USD $2.2 billion in 2015. Falling lithium-ion battery costs, along with Tesla’s Powerwall are giving glimpses of its potential. By 2030, IRENA projects battery storage for electricity could reach 250 GW, nearly 250 times more than currently.

Policy-wise, the move towards cleaner sources of energy is helping move nations in the right direction. Currently, 170 countries have created renewable energy targets, while 150 have a policy in place to boost renewable energy investments, IRENA said.

This strong support by countries overwhelmingly to transition to renewable energy has seen strong global investments this century. In 2004, this figure was USD $50 billion. In 2015, renewable energy investment reached a record USD $348 billion.

Emerging market countries including China and India have been serious players. China recently has said they are committed to spending USD $361 billion through 2020 on renewables. Meanwhile, accounting firm Ernst & Young’s 2016 report pointed to developing nations including Egypt, Mexico, and Chile are becoming hotspots for renewable energy investors compared to European markets.

There will be challenges, including the new US administration lead by Donald Trump who has vowed cut backs in renewable energy investments and may pull out of the Paris climate accord.

However, countries, including China are promising to pick up the slack and pull away in the cleantech race.

IRENA’s analysis of the cleantech market proves renewable energy on the global level, will only become more competitive and transform energy markets.

To read IRENA’s full report, view here.

 

Essential Tips on Live Social Media Video Etiquette

Live social media video is growing thanks to Periscope, and of course, Facebook Live.

According to the Social Media Marketing Industry Report, video use is on the increase. The report said 60% of marketers are currently using video, while 73% on using it more in the future.

social-1673031_1920
Image Credit via Pixabay by JanBaby under Public Domain via Creative Commons

Meanwhile, half of the marketers intend on using live video platforms including Periscope and Facebook Live. Another 50% are eager to learn more on capitalizing on live video.

However, live video can wreak havoc on your brand if not used correctly.

According to Sports Illustrated, Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown posted a Facebook Live video after they won 18-16 against the Kansas City Chiefs in the AFC Divisional playoffs. Steelers coach Mike Tomlin was caught dissing their upcoming AFC final opponents the New England Patriots, as “A-holes.” Not only did Brown’s gaffe of finding Tomlin cursing about their opponents show disrespect ahead of this game, but it also broke other ideas of etiquette including, locker room banter which normally is off-limits.  Brown later apologized for his error.

Ultimately it was a public relations blunder for the Steelers. Because of Mr. Brown’s action this provides some lessons in live video etiquette.

Whether you are Mr. Brown or someone who is planning live broadcasts for their small business, here are some simple tips to ensure your event goes smoothly.

  1. No Acts of Debauchery.

This is a no-brainer. Yes, Facebook Live or Periscope is a great tool to show your brand off and create some great social buzz.

However, this does mean you should not go acting like a drunken sailor cursing up a storm or doing the funky chicken. Harm may occur to your brand. Marketers need to plan ahead of the event to ensure this potential gaffes and miscues don’t happen. A dress rehearsal, and providing updates to all participants before going live will reduce potential gaffes.

  1. No Racial or Sexual References.

Number two makes common sense. No is no when it comes to making indecent racial or sexual comments. I call this an automatic red card. Do not even dare to make comments or content of a racial or sexual nature. You will drop points with possible new customers (who WERE maybe) thinking about buying your product and likely lose current customers. So just leave sexually or racial ideas off the table and put them in the BFI garbage bin.

  1. Ensure Privacy, Confidentiality, and Copyright.

Confidentiality and privacy when looking at etiquette for producing live video content, is severely needs more scrutiny. With many stories of privacy breaches ranging from Shoppers Drug Mart and Target, marketers need to address this prior to filming.

When preparing your broadcast, ensure all confidential company information (i.e. financial statements, bank statements, business plans) are not laid out showing in a public area. Rather, find a private place to store confidential documents where they are not within proximity of the broadcast.

As well, make sure there is nothing that will infringe on any potential copyright issues (including images and yes, even music. Check out the Creative Commons in looking for pictures or music for use while limiting copyright concerns.  On a personal note, I was at a Winnipeg Jets game recently and did a brief Facebook Live broadcast of the pregame warmup. However, I could not post the video up for those who wanted to view it later. The reason: there was a song in the background that may have infringed on copyright. I did not post the video. This lesson shows the need in being diligent to guarantee no faux pas on security, privacy or copyright issues.

When following these types, you will minimize your risk of creating controversy, and severe headaches for your brand. So work hard, have fun and have a blast when making your next live video.

 

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑