Search

Salay Consulting & Social Media Services

CleanTech & Renewable Energy Research, Social Media, Tech Trends

Tag

CleanTechnica.com

This week In #CleanTech September 10, 2017

Here is your weekly roundup of the unique, hottest stories related to cleantech, and climate policy for the week of September 10, 2017.

China and the United Kingdom (U.K.) announced this week they are collaborating on five next generation off shore renewable energy technologies (ORE).

pinwheel-1340203_1920
Offshore Wind Turbine via Pixabay by andreas160578. Under Public Domain via Creative Commons.

According to CNBC.com, both countries will work on five projects over three years which will focus on the challenges of developing ORE systems related to wind, tide, wave, and offshore energy.

Funded jointly by the U.K.-China Offshore Renewable Energy Program,  the partnership will also look at the social and economic benefits of ORE projects, including the possibilities for coastal communities of providing steady, clean power, CNBC notes.

“This £4 million investment will support collaborative research into the next generation of offshore technologies with one of our largest global trading partners, unlocking further opportunities for projects across the U.K. and the rest of the world,” said Richard Harrington, the United Kingdom’s Minister of Energy.

By announcing a collaboration with the U.K., shows China’s furthering strength of not only as a clean tech leader but also firming itself as a world political powerhouse. China leads in wind and solar installations and has committed to at least $360 billion in cleantech investments by 2020.

China also gains further a partner in developing its offshore renewable energy potential by teaming up with a country with offshore experience of the United Kingdom. The U.K. ranks as a leader in offshore wind power as they are an island country utilizes its offshore wind power. The U.K. accounts for just below 36% of all global offshore wind energy capacity, according to the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC). Meanwhile, the UK also gains from China’s advanced knowledge of how to scale renewable energy projects, with its solar and wind power industries.

And in a week of collaboration announcements continues. Germany will be helping India with the integration of renewable power on the grid.

According to CleanTechnica.com, the European and Asian giants will work together under the Indo-German Energy Programme — Green Energy Corrido. GIZ, a German development organization, will help provide technical advice to regulators and agencies in India on fusing renewable energy into its current grid infrastructure.

It’s hoped the project will have by 2022 175GW of renewable energy capacity tied to the grid. Grid integration of renewable electricity has already become a challenge within the country. CleanTechnica.com notes developers of direct solar and wind power decrease generation when there is not sufficient transmission capacity on the grid. Direct revenue losses to project developers occur when this happens. India is going big on renewables including on solar, as they look to curb carbon emissions. CleanTechnica.com said India plans to install 100GW by 2022.

Have a question on cleantech or climate policy? Drop a line at salayconsulting@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter at @salayservices.

This week In #CleanTech July 23, 2017

Here is your weekly roundup of the unique, hottest stories related to cleantech, and climate policy for the week of July 23, 2017.

windrader-2244174_1920 (1)
Image Credit via Pixabay by lukabieri. Under Public Domain via Credit Commons

General Electric’s (GE) renewable energy section saw a strong profit jump in the first half of 2017. According to reNEWS, GE’s cleantech division showed a gain of $267US billion, up from $211US billion (27%) for the first six months of 2016. A big wind turbine order for Invenergy’s Texas wind farm and collaboration with Fortum’s digital hydro plant in Sweden provided underlying support for GE, reNEWS noted. Overall, GE renewable energy business earned $4.5US billion, another big jump compared to the first half of 2016 ($3.8US billion). GE’s investments in renewable energy were perhaps one of the few highlights for the multinational company, whose revenue was 2% for the first half of 2017, compared to the first six months of 2016. GE Jeffrey Immelt in recent years have been adamant on the need for going big on renewable energy investment, as he sees it as a key growth sector. He even urged US president Donald Trump to stay in the Paris climate accord. Too bad, Trump did not see it that way. Moving forward in the second half of 2017, it will be interesting how not only GE’s overall financial performance is but their cleantech section. If GE’s renewable energy continues to grow, while the rest of the company’s margins drop, expect more investors eyes to glaze over GE’s renewable energy portfolio.

In India, Tata Power will infuse $90US million in Tata Power Renewable Energy Limited. CleanTechnica.com said the Indian company would use the financing to support large-scale solar projects totaling 320MW. Currently, Tata Power has 2GW worth in wind and solar energy projects. Although India is one of the highest carbon emitting countries on Earth, they are also becoming an emerging leader in the global renewable energy markets. Earlier this spring, India had passed 12GW of solar installed, more than four times of total capacity in 2014 (2.650GW). Concerns over extreme weather events from a changing climate, reducing energy poverty, while utilizing clean power, are some reasons why India is building on its renewable energy investments in recent years.

Just when you thought 2017 would not be one of the hottest years on record, you could be wrong. According to Scientific American, global temperatures have been 1.64F above the global temperature average (56.3F) this year. If everything continues at this pace, 2017, will be the second hottest year, just behind last year, 2016.

What scientists are stumped is how high the temperature increase is. Scientific American notes in periods after El-Nino, global heat patterns would drop or stay flat. However, temperatures have continued to go up, even without El-Nino. Gavin Schmidt predicts a 57% chance 2017 will be the second warmest year in the planet’s history, only behind 2016.

With increasing temperatures also increases the risks of extreme weather, according to analysts. This year is holding those patterns valid all over the globe. Ontario February thunderstorms, record rainfall in eastern Canada, causing flooding, to British Columbia wildfires are just some of the extreme weather events which have played across Canada this year. Meanwhile, Futurism said 2017 in the US has been one of the wettest and hottest recorded.

Perhaps Climate Progress said it best when “This matters because when a month — or six-month period — see record high global temperatures in the absence of an El Niño, that is a sign the underlying global warming trend is stronger than ever.”

Do you think GE’s Renewable Energy division will continue being a bright spot heading into the last six months? Do you think 2017 will be the second hottest year on the planet?

Drop a line with your thoughts at salayconsulting@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter at @salayservices.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑